Acts: Week 4, Day 5

Acts 9:19b–30 with Galatians 1:11–24.

Saul is converted and begins his unorthodox path – not consulting with the Apostles or established church, he instead goes to Arabia and Damascus, before spending a 2 week “visit’ to Jerusalem.

13. (Challenge) a.  Galatians 1:17–20. Arabia for 3 years then back to Damascus

b. Another interesting question.  So here is the argument of that day against christianity – “it is just “group-think”. ” You have a core of really influential people, Peter and the Apostles, who get on a roll and everyone falls in line with their teaching.  But, out of left field, now we have Paul.  He is clearly not sitting at the feet of “the Way” learning from them.  Instead, he was a man, deeply steeped in the jewish law, who realized he was blind but now sees.  His revelation is from Jesus, not man.

14.Lasted 15 days, visited Peter, saw no other apostles, only James, the brother of Jesus. The christians feared him, but Barnabas spoke up for him and his teaching.  He was received and commissioned back into his home land.

Conclusion:  A few points on Saul and Arabia.  The unanswered question of Question 13a is what did Saul do in Arabia for up to 3 years.  And the answer is, we don’t know.  Some think he went to spend time alone with God.  Some think he followed a path like Moses and Isaiah.  Some think he studied under locals in the area much like Moses did under his father-in-law.  This last point is contradicted by Paul’s accounts that he received the truth of the gospel from direct revelation and not from man.

But here is what I think is really neat about this period of time: I don’t think Paul knew, either.  Stay with me for a minute on this, it is really important.  In Acts 9, Acts 22, Acts 26 and Galations 1 we see that Paul is filled with the Holy Spirit and God is directly telling him what to do and where to go and Paul is being fully obedient.  So why did Paul go to Arabia.  If you believe what is written, it is clearly because God wanted him to go there.  Why?  We don’t know and I’m not sure Paul ever knew (at least not while on this earth).  I think if he knew, if there was some revelation that occurred, he would have told about it – but he didn’t.

But isn’t this how it sometimes is in our lives?  We pray, we listen, we obey and we end up in a place asking, “what am I doing here, God?”  and we simply don’t get an answer or at least not right away.  Maybe it is for us to spend some quiet time.  Maybe it is because other things need to line up.  Maybe it is because we need to be there because of or for someone else.  Maybe it is simply to teach us to trust in God and be patient for His timing.  I don’t know.  We don’t know.

But, the important thing is that God knows and He is in control, even when we don’t have a clue why we are where we are or what He is preparing for us to do.  So what do we do when it happens.  Here is what I’m learning:

  1. It isn’t just me – this same thing happens to people like the Apostle Paul
  2. God has a plan – I don’t need to come up with a “better plan” and try to pray Him into following it
  3. I do, however, need to keep praying and keep myself filled with the holy spirit so I don’t miss whatever my next calling is (miss, probably isn’t the right word, God will get me there, regardless, but maybe if I’m paying close enough attention He can do it without resorting to the 2×4 whack it often takes)
  4. I need to find ways to make the most of the time I am spending waiting.  Joseph worked doing odds and ends jobs. Moses learned a trade (tending sheep).  The Apostles did a bible study on Psalms and prayed and organized.  But in all cases, they stayed close to God and found people filled with the spirit and with wisdom to have fellowship with while waiting.
  5. Trusting in God’s timing and being patient are some of the hardest things to do in our spiritual walk
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